You may have heard the buzz over VantaBlack, supposedly the blackest black substance in existence created by Surrey NanoSystems. Apparently (and also obviously) VantaBlack is a chemical which means if, for some reason, you want a dose of it, you will need to acquire a government export license to get it out of UK and if you are in the UK, cost might be an issue, or so we heard, and even if weren’t you’d be questioned on why do you need the foul smelling substance for. Surely, if you just want to paint something black, you won’t want it to smell like chemicals, do you?

Stuart Semple Black 2.0 The World’s Mattest Blackest Paint

Anyways, I am not sure why you or anyone else want VantaBlack, but if you one, well then we have blinding news for you, mate. As it turns out, British artist Stuart Semple is more than than a painter who weaves magic with paint brushes; he is a chemist of sort too. He, with the help of thousands of artists from around the world, has created an alternative that’s both affordable and easily accessible to everyone. Called Black 2.0, this super black acrylic paint is said to “smell like cherries” (no shit!?) and with just a coat, almost any object becomes super black.

And made no mistake here. This is no Nippon or whatever brand ‘matte black’ paint which can still reflect teeny weeny bit of light. Anything coated with Black 2.0 reflects zero light. Absolutely no reflection. So, if you have a homemade satellite that needs to be blackened, this is it and as a boon, you can apply it with a peace of mind knowing that the substance ain’t toxic unlike the one that requires permit or whatnot. So, yay? I guess? If you are up for it, you can grab a bottle for your black hole on Earth project for 11.99 English pounds, or about US$15 based on today’s rate.

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Images: Stuart Semple.

via 9gag.

Published by Mike chua

Avid tech enthusiast, gadget lover, marketing critic and most importantly, love to reason and talk.