Aer Aerial Imaging Accessory for GoPro

Who Needs A Drone When You Can Throw A GoPro Into The Air?

If random, fun aerial images are your thing, then here’s the good news: you can save yourself thousands of dollars by not buying a drone and go with this dart-like, GoPro carrying contraption that allows you to take random, super short aerial images. Aer, as it is called, is the brainchild of a Netherlands startup that aims to make aerial imaging affordable and fun. Shaped like a rear section of a dart, albeit oversized, Aer has foam fins that enable stable flight and a front bumper designed to fit GoPro HERO 3+, 4 and 5 for capturing the dart’s point-of-view as it hurls through the air. It won’t be able to record controlled footages that last several minutes and therefore, it is not in anyway a replacement for an imaging drone, but it is a sure-fire way to capture random aerial images, or selfie from up above without emptying your wallets.

Aer Aerial Imaging Accessory for GoPro

The catch is, as mentioned, it will be random and so, in order to achieve what the video have pitched, you will have get down to some serious video editing to put those random images and/or videos together to create a montage so you don’t have click next video every few seconds. Aer is designed to protect your GoPro from shock, impact and water, and it floats too, so it is perfectly safe to be thrown in any way and in any direction you desire (watch out for the hornet nest, though). And also, it is imperative that you remember to hit the record shutter before you hurl it into the air.

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Aer Aerial Imaging Accessory for GoPro

Aer is all about fun and if fun is what you are after, it can be yours to own for €49, or about 55 American dollars at the time of this writing. However, it is a crowdfunding campaign which means, it will only be a reality if it hits or surpasses its set funding goal, and if it does, you can expect to be throwing your GoPro into the air sometime in February 2017. We must say, it is a surprisingly long wait for something that’s so not mechanically complex, eh?

Images courtesy of Aervideo.

via Technabob