When a company is known as professional camera maker, you’d know better not to be looking at their systems if you are an amateur photographer, or hell, even if you are a professional photographer who’s trying meet ends need. Phase One is one such company and if the Phase One Alpha A-series we featured two years ago had you falling off the chair, we guarantee this will do the same, perhaps even more. The Phase One IQ3 100MP Achromatic is not for faint of heart.

Phase One IQ3 100MP Achromatic Professional Camera
If your livelihood depends on the greatness of black and white like this one, this is the camera you want.

Despite it comes with an obscene asking price of $50,000 without lenses, it, instead of giving you more, has a little less to offer and in this instance, it is apparently lacking of the Bayer color filter necessary to recreate color images. That’s right. This pro camera system here only shoots in black and white, but as a boon, it will dish out images with “absolute detail, luminance values and subtle tonal beauty,” such as the example shown below above.

I appreciate the beauty of black and white photos, but I don’t appreciate staring at them for too long. After all, life isn’t black and white. Life is vibrant. However, if you are up for crazy detailed monochrome images, then this could be it. But that’s of course, provided that you command reasonably high for your work, else, they might us look away.

What captured my attention is the camera’s design; it sports a unique boxy form which hides a 101MP CMOS image sensor, supporting up to a pretty insane 51,200 ISO, and it has a couple of up-to-date features like built-in WiFi for data transfer (probably not recommended cos’ your files are going to be insanely huge) and oddly enough, a color-capable 3.2-inch touchscreen. I guess having a high-resolution monochrome display will bump the cost further? Perhaps.

NOW READ  Vecnos, A Ricoh Spin Off, Miniaturized 360-Degree Camera Into A Pen-like Form Factor

Images: Phase One/Joel Tjintjelaar.

Phase One via The Verge.

Published by Mike chua

Avid tech enthusiast, gadget lover, marketing critic and most importantly, love to reason and talk.