Ladies and gentlemen, the future depicted in Amazon Prime’s Upload is almost here. While we are still unable to upload the decease’s conscious into a highly realistic VR “heaven,” 3D printed food is beginning to take shape.

Alt-Steak Plant-based 3D Printed Meat

The latest to rock the food industry – specifically the steak market, is this: the world’s first Alt-Steak plant-based products. 3D printed steak is not new though, but this one definitely looks more palatable and has more science in it.

Created using Israel-based Redefine Meat’s patent-pending 3D meat printing technology, Alt-Steak promised to embody the texture, flavor and appearance of a real steak. The best part is, it can be produced in the volume and cost to enable large-scale market launch. In other words, it has the potential to become readily available.

Alt-Steak Plant-based 3D Printed Meat

Alt-Steak is created with the input from experts in their respective fields, including leading butchers, chefs, food technologists (yep, a thing) and close collaboration with taste expert (also a thing), Givaudan.

Using input from those experts, Redefine Meat is able to digitally mapped over 70 sensorial parameters into its Alt-Steak products that will replica premium beef cuts’ texture, juiciness, fat distribution and mouthfeel. That last statement sounds pretty surreal, don’t you think? Sounds totally like the future happening now.

Here’s even more futuristic about Alt-Steak:

“Layer by layer, the company’s proprietary industrial-scale 3D food printers create the Alt-Steak products using Redefine Meat’s Alt-Muscle, Alt-Fat, and Alt-Blood plant-based formulations. By printing with multiple materials, Redefine Meat can create sustainable, high-protein, no-cholesterol steaks that look, cook, and taste like beef.”

Now, I am curious as to how patty made out of 3D printed meat will taste like… Redefine Meat’s Alt-Steak plant-based product will enter market testing at “select high-end restaurants” later this year. Tell me, that does not sound like Upload happening in real life. Like, you know, only the rich can afford 3D printed food?

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Redefine Meat will pull data, including feedback from chefs and butchers, for the alt-meat formulations and also ramp up the production of its 3D meat printers in preparation of market distribution in 2021. That’s very soon. In the meantime, you can learn more about Redefine Meat’s Alt-Steak HERE.

Images: Redefine Meat.

Published by Mike chua

Avid tech enthusiast, gadget lover, marketing critic and most importantly, love to reason and talk.