The mention of robots, one would imagine human-like biped machines, but the LG CLOi SuitBot is not that. In fact, it looks more like a partial exoskeleton. Actually, it is an exoskeleton suit. Notwithstanding the obvious, LG is calling it a robot, a wearable one that it. Whatever you call it, it has all but one purpose: prevent injury to the wearer’s back. First revealed in August 2018 at IFA, the LG CLOi SuitBot has since been updated with a lot less part.

Previously, it sports a half exoskeleton design with supporting running all way down to the feet, but in this latest iteration, it is just a waist-worn device that sports supports running down from the hips to the thigh region. It is a very minimal design that should make it less intimidating to the users. It looks almost like wearing a complicated fanny pack… with some sort of thigh brace.

Updated LG CLOi SuitBot CES 2019

LG CLOi SuitBot is designed to support the waist and augments the user’s muscle power to reduce the risk of injury and fatigue when doing physical tasks like lifting and lowering heavy loads.

“SuitBot increases the user’s flexibility by enabling 50-degree extension and 90-degree flexion of the waist and activates when the wearer bends at a 65-degree angle, disengaging when standing in an upright position.”

The main component around the back also houses a battery pack that’s good for four hours of use per an hour charge. LG will be showing off the latest LG CLOi SuitBot, which is designed in collaboration with startup SG ROBOTICS, at this year’s CES in Vegas.

NOW READ  Blimp-type UAV Sucks In Air To Propel Itself Forward

The South Korean electronics giant will also demonstrate the improved versions of the company’s CLOi service robots, namely, PorterBot, ServeBot, and CartBot, which were first introduced at last year’s CES. LG said the trio is “nearing commercialization.” Though it is not known when exactly they will be pushed out into the market.

All images courtesy of LG.

Published by Mike chua

Avid tech enthusiast, gadget lover, marketing critic and most importantly, love to reason and talk.